Indic Studies Foundation

(a California non-Profit Organization)www.indicethos.org www.indicstudies.us

www.vepa.us  kaushal's blog

index  Disclaimer

 

 

 

 

 

Home about us The Story of the Calendar AIT The Andhra  Satavahana Kingdoms Arrians Hiistory of Alexander Henry Rooke Aryabhata I Archaeology Aryan Migration Theories Astronomy Baudhika Dharma Bhartrihari Biographies  (mathematical sciences) Bhagavad Gita Bibliography California Text Book Travesty Caste Contact Core Values The Dhaarmic traditions Dholavira Digital Library of Indian History Books Distortions in Indian History Economics Editorial Archives Eminent Scientists Famine in British Colonial  India The ethics of the Hindu Glossary The Great Bharata war HEC2007 Hinduism/faqdharma.html HinduWeddings History The Indic Mathematical Tradition Indic Philosophy & Darshanas Indcstrat Kalidasa Katyayana Mathematics News and Current Events Panini References on India (library of Congress) References on Indic History References on Philosophy References for Place value systems References on Vedic Mathematical Sciences Sanskrit The Sanatana Dharna Secularism and the Hindu The South Asia File Srinivasa Ramanujan Vedic Mathematicians I Vedic Mathematicians II Vedic Mathematicians III What's in a name VP Sarathi Ancient Indian Astronomy
 

 

 

 

 

Who are We?

What do we do?

Latest News

Free Resources

 

Links

 

Kaushal's blog

 

History and Geography

 

Saraswati Sindhu Civilization

 

 

The ruins of  Hampi, what was once the  great cities of its time (1565 CE) and the capital of the fabulous Vijayanagar Empire. The empire was established by the brothers  Harihara and Bukka Raya under the tutelage of the great Vedantic rishis of that age Vidyaranya and Sayana, photograph by  Michel Polizzi 

Vijayanagar, the capital of one of the largest Hindu empires in history, was founded by Sangama dynasty princes Harihara and Bukka in 1336. Its power peaked under Krishnadevaraya (1509-29), when it controlled nearly the whole of the peninsula south of the Krishna and Tungabhadra rivers. Comparable to Delhi in the 14th century, the city, with an estimated population of half a million, covered 33 sq km and was surrounded by several concentric lines of fortification. Its wealth derived from the control of spice trade and the cotton industry. Its busy bazaars, described by European travelers such as Portuguese Nunez and Paes, were centers of international commerce. The empire collapsed after the battle of Talikota in 1565 when the city was ransacked by the confederacy of Deccan sultans (Bidar, Bijapur, Golconda, Ahmednagar and Berar), thus opening up southern India for Muslim conquest.

The ruins are set in a strange and beautiful boulder strewn landscape with an almost magical quality. The undisputed highlight of the ruins, the 16th century Vittala Temple, is a World Heritage Monument. Started in the reign of Krishnadevaraya, it was never finished or consecrated, and its incredible sculptural work is the pinnacle of Vijayanagar art. The outer pillars are known as musical pillars as they reverberate when tapped. There's an ornate stone chariot in the temple courtyard containing an image of Garuda.   [-- Adapted from the Lonely Planet, India, 1999]

 

History of the Indic Civilization

 

A Prolegomena, March 17,2006

It is clear that much of  what we learned in our school history books is suspect if not downright erroneous, starting from the chronology of ancient India to the postulation of an Aryan Invasion, the location of the ancient home of the Zoroastrian people, the dating of Chandra Gupta Maurya's reign, the dating of the  Buddha himself, the embellishment of the Caste system by the Colonial overlord, the dating of the impregnation of  Indic culture in countries of South East Asia to name a few. More importantly, the Eurocentric approach to the narration of the fascinating story of Indian History taken by English authors is substantially at variance with the facts and the history as we knew it prior to the arrival of the Europeans in the Indian subcontinent. We will do our best  to peel the layers of the onion, but it is too large a task to be undertaken by a handful of individuals, especially as the narration of this   history is firmly in the grip of the Marxists who are deeply ensconced in New Delhi and whose viewpoint is substantially in conformance with the story as told by the British. Why do Indian Marxists espouse a blatantly colonialist point of view ? There is more than one overriding reason, but we will illustrate one

Karl Marx set the tone for the study of Indian history by writing  series of articles on India during the Great Rebellion of 1857. He was in fact a correspondent for the New York Daily Tribune. Of course Karl Marx had never stepped foot in India. But it was a temper of the times. A white man was always preferred for such intellectual tasks over an Indian , even though the subject was India. Unfortunately when it comes to the subject of Ancient Indian history this attitude is pervasive even today.  His articles are indicative of a person highly prejudiced against India. here is a sample

"How came it that English supremacy was established in India? The paramount power of the Great Mogul was broken by the Mogul Viceroys. The power of the Viceroys was broken by the Mahrattas. The power of the Mahrattas was broken by the Afghans, and while all were struggling against all, the Briton rushed in and was enabled to subdue them all. A country not only divided between Mahommedan and Hindoo, but between tribe and tribe, between caste and caste; a society whose framework was based on a sort of equilibrium, resulting from a. general repulsion and constitutional exclusiveness between all its members. Such a country and such a society, were they not the predestined prey of conquest? If we knew nothing of the past history of Hindostan, would there not be the one great and incontestable fact, that even at this moment India is held in English thralldom by an Indian army maintained at the cost of India? India, then, could not escape the fate of being conquered, and the whole of her past history, if it be anything, is the history of the successive conquests she has undergone. Indian society has no history at all, at least no known history. What we call its history, is but the history of the successive intruders who founded their empires on the passive basis of that unresisting and unchanging society. The question, therefore, is not whether the English had a right to conquer India, but whether we are to prefer India conquered by the Turk, by the Persian, by the Russian, to India conquered by the Briton.

England has to fulfill a double mission in India: one destructive, the other regenerating the annihilation of old Asiatic society, and the laying the material foundations of Western society in Asia.

Arabs, Turks, Tartars, Moguls, who had successively overrun India, soon became Hindooized, the barbarian conquerors being, by an eternal law of history, conquered themselves by the superior civilization of their subjects. The British were the first conquerors superior, and therefore, inaccessible to Hindoo civilization. They destroyed it by breaking up the native communities, by uprooting the native industry, and by leveling all that was great and elevated in the native society. The historic pages of their rule in India report hardly anything beyond that destruction. The work of regeneration hardly transpires through a heap of ruins. Nevertheless it has begun.

The political unity of India, more consolidated, and extending farther than it ever did under the Great Moguls, was the first condition of its regeneration. That unity, imposed by the British sword, will now be strengthened and perpetuated by the electric telegraph. The native army, organized and trained by the British drill-sergeant, was the sine qua non of Indian self-emancipation, and of India ceasing to be the prey of the first foreign intruder. The free press, introduced for the first time into Asiatic society, and managed principally by the common offspring of Hindoos and Europeans, is a new and powerful agent of reconstruction."

The Future Results of British Rule in India

(if that does not work try this )

Well one might argue, that was not so bad. He is just reiterating the basic idea that everything good in India came from somewhere else. Perhaps so, coming from a European, after all it was the temper of the times when Europe believed it was its manifest destiny to rule the world, as they belonged to a superior race as Karl Marx put it without mincing any words. But his viewpoint is held by many of the Marxist Historians in India today. Unfortunately not much can be  said  about their integrity either. One of their many shenanigans is promising to write 19 volumes on the Indian national freedom movement  (what a choice) and delivering only 3,all at the expense of the national exchequer to the tune of over a million $,definitely a large sum of money in those days ( the 70's).For the whole sordid story, see Arun Shourie on Eminent Historians. The bottom line is one cannot rely on the present breed of Indian Marxists, who remain firmly in control over the national agenda, to redress the falsehoods and Eurocentrisms that have dominated the narration of Indian History during the last 150 years.

We invite like minded people to join with us in this noble endeavor in conducting  research and writing accurate accounts of Indian historical events on these topics or to fund graduate studies  in these areas to promising youngsters. In the pages to follow we will layout a plan for projects to be studied. In the meantime here are some interesting papers and books to whet your appetite.

HEC2007

Digitized Text   Books on Indian History

 

Selective Links

Misdating Important Events in Indic Chronology

The Chronology Index

The    Andhra   Satavahanas

Misdating by Bharateeya Historiography

Bibliography

References on Indic History

Indic Mercantilism

Indian Armed Forces ((from antiquity to the Present)

Medieval India (1200 CE to 1745 CE)

Slavery and the Indian Slave trade  during the middle ages by Scot Levi

2002, November: 'Hindus Beyond the Hindu Kush: Indians in the Central Asian Slave Trade,' Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 3d ser. (12, 3), pp. 277-88

Hindus beyond the Hindu Kush, Indians in the Central Asian slave trade by Scott Levi

British Colonial India and the Freedom Movement

Caste and Ethnographic Mapping

Drain of Wealth by the British during Colonial era

The invention of Pakistan

Goa a modern perspective

The Ghost of Macaulay Haunts 171 Years Later

British Raj , random notes

 

Post Independence (1947 CE)

Chronology of Indo-Pak Conflict

 

 

 

Ancient India (up to 1 CE)

Chronology of Ancient India

New Light on Ancient India

The West Discovers Arthasastra

Democracy in Ancient India

Vedic dating of the Buddha

Andhra Kingdoms

Book reviews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact UsAbout UsCore ValuesCurrent EventsEconomicsHomeHistory

Copyright ŠKosla Vepa


View My Stats

Who are We?

What do we do?

Latest News

Free Resources

 

Links

 

Kaushal's blog

 

History and Geography

 

Saraswati Sindhu Civilization

 

 

The ruins of  Hampi, what was once the  great cities of its time (1565 CE) and the capital of the fabulous Vijayanagar Empire. The empire was established by the brothers  Harihara and Bukka Raya under the tutelage of the great Vedantic rishis of that age Vidyaranya and Sayana, photograph by  Michel Polizzi 

Vijayanagar, the capital of one of the largest Hindu empires in history, was founded by Sangama dynasty princes Harihara and Bukka in 1336. Its power peaked under Krishnadevaraya (1509-29), when it controlled nearly the whole of the peninsula south of the Krishna and Tungabhadra rivers. Comparable to Delhi in the 14th century, the city, with an estimated population of half a million, covered 33 sq km and was surrounded by several concentric lines of fortification. Its wealth derived from the control of spice trade and the cotton industry. Its busy bazaars, described by European travelers such as Portuguese Nunez and Paes, were centers of international commerce. The empire collapsed after the battle of Talikota in 1565 when the city was ransacked by the confederacy of Deccan sultans (Bidar, Bijapur, Golconda, Ahmednagar and Berar), thus opening up southern India for Muslim conquest.

The ruins are set in a strange and beautiful boulder strewn landscape with an almost magical quality. The undisputed highlight of the ruins, the 16th century Vittala Temple, is a World Heritage Monument. Started in the reign of Krishnadevaraya, it was never finished or consecrated, and its incredible sculptural work is the pinnacle of Vijayanagar art. The outer pillars are known as musical pillars as they reverberate when tapped. There's an ornate stone chariot in the temple courtyard containing an image of Garuda.   [-- Adapted from the Lonely Planet, India, 1999]

 

History of the Indic Civilization

 

A Prolegomena, March 17,2006

It is clear that much of  what we learned in our school history books is suspect if not downright erroneous, starting from the chronology of ancient India to the postulation of an Aryan Invasion, the location of the ancient home of the Zoroastrian people, the dating of Chandra Gupta Maurya's reign, the dating of the  Buddha himself, the embellishment of the Caste system by the Colonial overlord, the dating of the impregnation of  Indic culture in countries of South East Asia to name a few. More importantly, the Eurocentric approach to the narration of the fascinating story of Indian History taken by English authors is substantially at variance with the facts and the history as we knew it prior to the arrival of the Europeans in the Indian subcontinent. We will do our best  to peel the layers of the onion, but it is too large a task to be undertaken by a handful of individuals, especially as the narration of this   history is firmly in the grip of the Marxists who are deeply ensconced in New Delhi and whose viewpoint is substantially in conformance with the story as told by the British. Why do Indian Marxists espouse a blatantly colonialist point of view ? There is more than one overriding reason, but we will illustrate one

Karl Marx set the tone for the study of Indian history by writing  series of articles on India during the Great Rebellion of 1857. He was in fact a correspondent for the New York Daily Tribune. Of course Karl Marx had never stepped foot in India. But it was a temper of the times. A white man was always preferred for such intellectual tasks over an Indian , even though the subject was India. Unfortunately when it comes to the subject of Ancient Indian history this attitude is pervasive even today.  His articles are indicative of a person highly prejudiced against India. here is a sample

"How came it that English supremacy was established in India? The paramount power of the Great Mogul was broken by the Mogul Viceroys. The power of the Viceroys was broken by the Mahrattas. The power of the Mahrattas was broken by the Afghans, and while all were struggling against all, the Briton rushed in and was enabled to subdue them all. A country not only divided between Mahommedan and Hindoo, but between tribe and tribe, between caste and caste; a society whose framework was based on a sort of equilibrium, resulting from a. general repulsion and constitutional exclusiveness between all its members. Such a country and such a society, were they not the predestined prey of conquest? If we knew nothing of the past history of Hindostan, would there not be the one great and incontestable fact, that even at this moment India is held in English thralldom by an Indian army maintained at the cost of India? India, then, could not escape the fate of being conquered, and the whole of her past history, if it be anything, is the history of the successive conquests she has undergone. Indian society has no history at all, at least no known history. What we call its history, is but the history of the successive intruders who founded their empires on the passive basis of that unresisting and unchanging society. The question, therefore, is not whether the English had a right to conquer India, but whether we are to prefer India conquered by the Turk, by the Persian, by the Russian, to India conquered by the Briton.

England has to fulfill a double mission in India: one destructive, the other regenerating the annihilation of old Asiatic society, and the laying the material foundations of Western society in Asia.

Arabs, Turks, Tartars, Moguls, who had successively overrun India, soon became Hindooized, the barbarian conquerors being, by an eternal law of history, conquered themselves by the superior civilization of their subjects. The British were the first conquerors superior, and therefore, inaccessible to Hindoo civilization. They destroyed it by breaking up the native communities, by uprooting the native industry, and by leveling all that was great and elevated in the native society. The historic pages of their rule in India report hardly anything beyond that destruction. The work of regeneration hardly transpires through a heap of ruins. Nevertheless it has begun.

The political unity of India, more consolidated, and extending farther than it ever did under the Great Moguls, was the first condition of its regeneration. That unity, imposed by the British sword, will now be strengthened and perpetuated by the electric telegraph. The native army, organized and trained by the British drill-sergeant, was the sine qua non of Indian self-emancipation, and of India ceasing to be the prey of the first foreign intruder. The free press, introduced for the first time into Asiatic society, and managed principally by the common offspring of Hindoos and Europeans, is a new and powerful agent of reconstruction."

The Future Results of British Rule in India

(if that does not work try this )

Well one might argue, that was not so bad. He is just reiterating the basic idea that everything good in India came from somewhere else. Perhaps so, coming from a European, after all it was the temper of the times when Europe believed it was its manifest destiny to rule the world, as they belonged to a superior race as Karl Marx put it without mincing any words. But his viewpoint is held by many of the Marxist Historians in India today. Unfortunately not much can be  said  about their integrity either. One of their many shenanigans is promising to write 19 volumes on the Indian national freedom movement  (what a choice) and delivering only 3,all at the expense of the national exchequer to the tune of over a million $,definitely a large sum of money in those days ( the 70's).For the whole sordid story, see Arun Shourie on Eminent Historians. The bottom line is one cannot rely on the present breed of Indian Marxists, who remain firmly in control over the national agenda, to redress the falsehoods and Eurocentrisms that have dominated the narration of Indian History during the last 150 years.

We invite like minded people to join with us in this noble endeavor in conducting  research and writing accurate accounts of Indian historical events on these topics or to fund graduate studies  in these areas to promising youngsters. In the pages to follow we will layout a plan for projects to be studied. In the meantime here are some interesting papers and books to whet your appetite.

HEC2007

Digitized Text   Books on Indian History

 

Selective Links

Misdating Important Events in Indic Chronology

The Chronology Index

The    Andhra   Satavahanas

Misdating by Bharateeya Historiography

Bibliography

References on Indic History

Indic Mercantilism

Indian Armed Forces ((from antiquity to the Present)

Medieval India (1200 CE to 1745 CE)

Slavery and the Indian Slave trade  during the middle ages by Scot Levi

2002, November: 'Hindus Beyond the Hindu Kush: Indians in the Central Asian Slave Trade,' Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 3d ser. (12, 3), pp. 277-88

Hindus beyond the Hindu Kush, Indians in the Central Asian slave trade by Scott Levi

British Colonial India and the Freedom Movement

Caste and Ethnographic Mapping

Drain of Wealth by the British during Colonial era

The invention of Pakistan

Goa a modern perspective

The Ghost of Macaulay Haunts 171 Years Later

British Raj , random notes

 

Post Independence (1947 CE)

Chronology of Indo-Pak Conflict

 

 

 

Ancient India (up to 1 CE)

Chronology of Ancient India

New Light on Ancient India

The West Discovers Arthasastra

Democracy in Ancient India

Vedic dating of the Buddha

Andhra Kingdoms

Book reviews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact UsAbout UsCore ValuesCurrent EventsEconomicsHomeHistory

Copyright ŠKosla Vepa


View My Stats